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tenaki
12-28-2003, 12:44 PM
Hi all, I couldn't find a home for this under the other categories so if wrong please feel free to move it.

When looking at my stats I think "that's good" they are going up etc etc but here is the confession. I am not really sure what they all mean.

The numbers are big (in the millions for hits) but I think there is more to it than that. Can you help.

Here are the main headings:

Sites
KBytes
Visits
Pages
Files
Hits

Hits are huge and visits aren't so bad either but whereas hits are in the millions, visits are in the thousands.

And what about files, pages eeek!

As usual, any help appreciated

ldyguique
12-28-2003, 06:01 PM
The site stats that you are reviewing sound similar to those used by UrchinStats - which also has a large help document that explains "how" Urchin tracks. If you cannot find the help link in your own WebHosting company's documentation, you might find it on help.urchin.com.

However, in general,

visits = visitors (if the same visitor returns using the same IP address within 24 hours, they are not counted again)

hits = clicks (i.e., a visitor clicks on various links or pages to read more)

sites is similar to the term servers = what page was the visitor on just prior to reaching your site; it will usually show the search engines used as these are the most common.

kbytes = the size of the files downloaded by the visitor (in this particular case, download is the term for them accessing various pages and pulling them through to their equipment as webpages are still files, NOT download as in file transfers). Most webhosting companies allocate x amount of bandwidth for each account -- this tracks bandwidth as a total figure for the month-to-date, as well as which particular files were accessed the most often.

This can be an important number if one is in danger of exceeding their bandwidth allocation, as the excess bandwidth charges can be expensive. A problem file will show up in the first position, especially if it's a music file. These tend to be large and if music plays everytime someone visits the home page, it's possible to see bandwidth stats skyrocketing. Generally, the file shown will be index.htm and/or a *.swf file is one is using flash.

tenaki
12-28-2003, 06:31 PM
Thank you that is very helpful.

So if we get so many visits but huge hits that means we are keeping those "visitors" busy on our site?

So if that is right, my content (community website) is fine and I need to work on getting more visitors.

That helps to narrow the priorities down abit.

I haven't seen a help section on the control panel but I will look a bit deeper.

Ta

minstrel
12-28-2003, 06:55 PM
How to translate those terms depends in part on how your website is constructed. The following is from three quickly-selected Google sources:


Each hit to a web site doesn't necessarily represent one visitor. Generally, hits refer to not only the web page itself, but all files requested, including all graphics (and include files). Therefore, if a page has 50 graphics, each visitor to that page represents 51 hits - one hit for the page and 50 for the graphics. As you can see, “Hits” can be very misleading when representing web site traffic. Page views refers to the number of times each page on your site is viewed by a visitor. If your site has 30 pages, and a visitor goes to all pages, that visitor generated 30 page views. source (http://www.dvbaratta.com/Hosting/Hits-Visitors/hits-visitors.html)

Web statistics are the best way to track your website marketing progress. The three main statistics that will show your overall progress are hits, visitors and page views. Hits are tracked when any picture or page loads from your server on to a visitors browser. I would suggest that you not really pay attention to hits because they are sometimes misleading. For instance if you have 10 pictures on your page, you will be awarded 11 hits for each time someone fully loads that page. Visitors are a better way to track your website progress. Every time someone visits your site you will be awarded a visitor... Page views are a good indication of how "sticky" your website is. A good statistic to keep is Page Views divided by the number of Visitors you have. This statistic will give you a good idea if your content is interesting and if your visitors are staying on your site for a long time and surfing. source (http://www.internetmarketinginfo.com/hitspv.html)

Short Answer: Hits are accesses to the server; page views are accesses to HTML pages; visitors are unique visitors to the site, and sessions are visits to the site.

Long Answer: Hits are accepted log entries. So if there are 5000 entries in your log file, and there are no log filters, and all the entries are valid (i.e., none of them have corrupt dates), then [you will see] 5000 hits for the file. If there are log filters that reject certain log entries, then those will not appear as hits. Log entries that are accepted, either using "accept as hits" or using "accept as page view" will count toward the hits totals. Because there are no default filters that reject, you will generally have nearly as many reported hits as you have log entries. Page views correspond to hits on pages. For instance, if you're analyzing a web log, and a hit on index.html is followed by 100 hits on 100 images, style sheets, and JavaScript files, that appear in that page, then it will count as a single page view--the secondary files do not add to the total. This is implemented in the log filters--page views are defined as log entries that are accepted by a log filter "as page views." Log entries that are accepted by the filters, but are accepted "as hits" rather than "as page views" do not contribute to the page views total. By default, page views are all hits that are not GIFs, JPEGs, PNGs, CCSs, ICOs, SWFs, JSs, or .class files. See Hits, above, for more information on log filters. source (http://www.sawmill.net/cgi-bin/sawmilldocs?ho+faq-datatypes)

tenaki
12-28-2003, 08:24 PM
minstrel as always a very good answer,thanks.

What threw me was the hits I think, as most sites advertise their "hits" and obviously now I know, these can be a bit misleading.

As I said before, I think going by my stats my site is reasonably sticky (I like that term)I need to work on visitors, I get about 21,000 visits a month compared to 3 million hits per month.

Not sure if that is good, bad or middling but I now know where I am aiming for........

Back to google and my search engine tactics

ronniethedodger
12-28-2003, 11:52 PM
What threw me was the hits I think, as most sites advertise their "hits" and obviously now I know, these can be a bit misleading.


They can be a lot misleading. Another factor is that a single page view can generate several hits, if not several...a whole lot.

Consider a product page with 16 products on it. Each product thumbnail can generate a hit. Then there is a hit for maybe a CSS file, or a JS file. More hits for other graphics. If the page is dynamic, such as .shtml file...it will generate hits for each include file.

One could easily brag about millions of hits, but you know now that it is nothing but hot air.



As I said before, I think going by my stats my site is reasonably sticky (I like that term)I need to work on visitors, I get about 21,000 visits a month compared to 3 million hits per month.

Not sure if that is good, bad or middling but I now know where I am aiming for........

I would say that 21,000 visitors a month is pretty darn good...and if it isn't, it is darn good place to start out at. It breaks down to about 700 visitors per day.

But one thing you have to remember, just as in the hits discussed earlier....visitor counting can be misleading also. It would depend on the method of how those visitors are counted.

Technically...one could visit your site and hit the refresh button and trigger another tally on the visitor counter. Sometimes just going to another page within the site can tally another count as a visit also.

You will often hear someone question a visitor count, and ask "well, are those unique visits?".

Most basic stat reporting that you get from the canned reports at your Web Hosting service, will not differentiate between multiple visits from the same visitor. If they do a halfway decent job of it in the least, the figures are still over-inflated.

...and as to what to aim for? That is a simple question to answer...hehehehe....more, lot's more! ;0)

matauri
12-29-2003, 12:55 AM
Here's one to play with...try putting your logo as your signature on here as I do & see how many hits it generates!

I can guage if I am spending too much time on here by the rise in my stats !



Cindy

ronniethedodger
12-29-2003, 01:34 AM
Here's one to play with...try putting your logo as your signature on here as I do & see how many hits it generates!

I can guage if I am spending too much time on here by the rise in my stats !


Hey Cindy....how about I refresh this page one-hundred times in the next five minutes? ;0)

For those people who do not understand what would happen if I refreshed the page -- doing so would send a request to Cindy's website for another copy of the logo image in her signature. The request generates a hit, which gets recorded in her stats.

Now I want everybody to refresh this page 100 times right now....which in turn will send her stats thru the roof leading her to believe that she is not only spending way too much time at WPW, but she is borderline psychotic about it too.

Do this for about a week, every day solid -- then suddenly stop doing it. Her stats will plummet and she will really be confused. ;0)
psst....keep this a secret ;0)