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chyann
07-23-2003, 01:10 PM
I thought a content management system was similar to a database for your articles???

jScott_Harris
07-24-2003, 11:25 AM
it is to a degree. But there's a difference between just databasing you articles and managing them. A CMS allows you to choose where things go, what's linked to from where and even your navigation system.

blair.henry
07-30-2003, 09:16 AM
Hey there,

Just looking through and noticed this post.

I thought I would give you some insight to a couple of content management systems I have used.

I generally have run these on a linux box with apache, php, and mysql.

http://www.postnuke.com Postnuke is one I just set up. It is very good.

http://www.phpnuke.com PHPNuke is another. It was like the precurser to postnuke. It is also very good.

http://www.mamboserver.com Mambo Site Server was the choice I made when creating our company intranet. It is very clean and professional.

ctmattice
08-02-2003, 10:35 PM
Has anyone heard of Tiki. It's a CMS written in php and available on sourceforge.

I use php-nuke as a CMS and like it. well yes and no, it is good but like some of those who have posted already it a pain to get the modules and blocks to work from version to version. Not to mention some of the scripting is difficult to understand.

It is getting better and I'll still use it but I thought i'd see if any one had any experience with tiki. It's suppose to be better at seperating the design and logic stages.

I'll probably wait a couple of weeks to see if I get any responces before playing with it.

chyann
08-03-2003, 04:55 PM
Thank you for that information. I was confused about whether there is a difference between a ordinary database and a CMS.

chyann
08-03-2003, 04:58 PM
Thank you for those resource recommendations. I do like to know how good the are from someone who has used them.

kplatt
09-08-2003, 04:03 PM
Chyann:
The company I work for has a content management whitepaper posted on the web that you may be interested in reading. Although some of the paper is geared toward marketing, I still think that you would find it interesting and worth the read to find out to find out more about content management in general.

http://www.commnav.com/docs/whitepapers/wp_content_management.pdf

Hope this helps.

CrimsonLink
07-07-2004, 07:31 AM
Hope this guide on CMS may help you:

http://pnavy.com/pnGuide/overview-cms.html

gflaig
10-16-2004, 06:20 AM
Kplatt's posting references a paper, which - after subtracting the marketing messages and the product specific informations - I think gives exactly the requested information about CMSes in GENERAL, even when after a short introduction, it concentrates on WEB CMS.

The real message in it: Content Management is everything, that accompanies "content" during its life, supplying support technology.

"content" is not just Web Content, it can be any un- or semi-structured information : Scanned images, office documents, web sites, advertising clips, music, in fact, how I would reference it, anything that starts with some Bits, ends with some Bits, and has a lot of Bits between.

"management" is a collection of tools - hopefully consistent tools - which support all stages of content's life.

Content's life starts with
[list:4707c6ee77]
capture (scan, type, record, whatever),

Content's life passes through

modification (update aware, revisions, versions),
business processes (creation, review, correction, publish and roles like author, owner, reviewer, end user)
lifecycle (States like draft, correction, approved, in production etc )
publishing processes like print, rendition in all senses, makeing websites productive and so on.
archival for documentation, for recording needs, following legal needs etc.

Content's life ends with destruction

per request like delete, invalidity or similar
on behalf of business, personal needs, based upon events etc.
of course by accident :-)
the destruction (besides accidentially) should be irreversal.

[/list:u:4707c6ee77]
Content Management, to honestly honour this name, must supply all the functionallity mentioned above,
for at least one portfolio of "content".

Dealing with specific flavours of "content" is very common in this area.

If it deals with "office document"s we tend to call it Document Management System.
If it deals with web "content" it should be called "Web Content Management System",
but this is short cut to just "CMS" not WCMS.
If it deals with originally printed mass data, it is often called "COLD" - Computer Output on Laser Disk.
Archaic term, but still in use.
If it deals with scanned images like e.g. scanned checks, incoming letters, etc, the often used term is "Imaging"
If it supports or promises supporting all or most of the above, it is called "Enterprise Content Management" or ECM, imputing, it does everything, that an enterprise needs in Content managemant area.

you see, "Content Management" is much more than usually visible !

webinv
11-09-2004, 05:56 PM
Don't forget to check out e107.org.

It is for the people who don't want to worry about looks as much as stability, speed, and power.

slideri812
11-18-2004, 07:20 PM
I have been lookng for a good ( and cheap ) cms for us to move into. We want to get away from static sites (even for our smalest clients). I have looked at Mombo more than once, but I have some questions:

1. Is it easy to set up and run? I will be installing i on a Linux box with SQL and PHP already installed

2. Can I create and manage multiple sites with a single install at the root?

3. I see they use skins, As we are designers we would want to use our own skins and templates. Whare can we learn more about what is involved with this.

4. Not only do we wish distributed content management for our clients site, we also want to speed up deployment time. Will using Mambo address these issues?

5. Am I asking questions here that are answered on their site? I read alot of the info, but some of it left me with more questions

6. I am not a programmer, though some consider the work we do a form of programing. As a non-PHP programer can I handle the dealing with updates and modules, and so on?

Thanx all.

P.S. I have used the Demo and I liked it very much.

webinv
11-19-2004, 03:12 PM
I have been lookng for a good ( and cheap ) cms for us to move into. We want to get away from static sites (even for our smalest clients). I have looked at Mombo more than once, but I have some questions:

1. Is it easy to set up and run? I will be installing i on a Linux box with SQL and PHP already installed

2. Can I create and manage multiple sites with a single install at the root?

3. I see they use skins, As we are designers we would want to use our own skins and templates. Whare can we learn more about what is involved with this.

4. Not only do we wish distributed content management for our clients site, we also want to speed up deployment time. Will using Mambo address these issues?

5. Am I asking questions here that are answered on their site? I read alot of the info, but some of it left me with more questions

6. I am not a programmer, though some consider the work we do a form of programing. As a non-PHP programer can I handle the dealing with updates and modules, and so on?

Thanx all.

P.S. I have used the Demo and I liked it very much.

You may wish to play around with the Mambo system all you want here.

http://www.opensourcecms.com/index.php?option=content&task=view&id=149